Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir van Lohuizen @ La Cité

The Arctic Gate terminal is located in the Gulf of Ob, near Cape Kamenny (Russia). The first oil barrel was shipped out from the terminal in 2014, and winter out-shipments started in 2015. It was launched as part of the Novy Port oil field development.
Yamal Peninsula (Russia), April 2018
© Yuri Kozyrev | NOOR for the Fondation Carmignac

Dedicated to the Arctic, chaired by Jean Jouzel, and under the patronage of the French Ambassador for the Arctic and Antarctic Poles, Minister Ségolène Royal, the 9th edition of the Carmignac Photojournalism Award went to Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir van Lohuizen (NOOR). Their awarded project Arctic: New Frontier will be exhibited in the Paris based Cité des sciences et de l’industrie.

The Carmignac Photojournalism Award funds annually the production of an investigative photo-reportage on human rights violations, geostrategic and environmental issues in the world. Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir van Lohuizen’s project is a pioneering double expedition which explores the effects of climate change on the entire Arctic territory. They want to experience the dramatic transformation of natural landscapes and the demographics in the Arctic, and the impact of these changes on the lives of the region’s inhabitants.

“The photos of Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir van Lohuizen are superb,” – says Jean Jouzel, climatologist, winner of the 2012 Vetlesen Award and co-winner of the 2007 Nobel Peace Award as Director of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change IPCC. – “Through them, from Siberia, Svalbard and Greenland to Canada and Alaska, we discover the Arctic of today, with its landscapes and wildlife that are drawing a growing number of tourists, as well as its populations who are exposed to extreme climates and who mine resources such as nickel and, increasingly, gas, oil and coal. Protecting the environment does not appear central to their activity, to put it mildly.”

For the very first time, two photojournalists have simultaneously covered the irreversible changes that have taken place in the Arctic, to bear witness to the effects of the melting of the ice-caps.

Yuri Kozyrev (doc! #7 & #37) travelled the route of the Russian maritime ports of the Arctic, accompanying the last remaining Nomadic people of the region, the Nenets, during their seasonal movement known as transhumance. This was interrupted for the first time in the Nenets’ history in 2018, because of the melting of the permafrost. Kozyrev skirted the coast of the Barents Sea in the north of the country, and travelled aboard the Monchegorsk, the first container ship to use the Northern Sea route unassisted. He encountered people who had been made ill by nickel mining in Norilsk, and then travelled to Murmansk, where the first floating nuclear power plant is under secret construction.

A whale hunter is on the outlook to track Bowhead whales. The Point Hope native community can catch 10 bowheads a year.
Point Hope (AK, USA), May 2018
© Kadir van Lohuizen | NOOR for the Fondation Carmignac

Kadir van Lohuizen (doc! #7 & #36) started his journey on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard archipelago. He then followed the Northwest Passage, which is now the shortest route between Europe and Asia thanks to the melting ice. In Greenland, he met scientists who have recently discovered the existence of frozen rivers beneath the ice-cap, which are directly contributing to the planet’s rising water levels. South of Cornwallis Island, off the coast of Canada, he lived in the small community of Resolute, which has recently been home to a training facility for the Canadian Army, as climate change has led to ever-increasing routes through the Arctic region. Finally, he travelled to Kivalina, an indigenous village on the northern tip of Alaska, which, according to current forecasts, will disappear underwater by 2025.

The forces of tourism, militarisation, exploitation of gas and mineral resources, and the opening of trade routes mean that the Arctic is today the site of clashes between countries and multinationals who are locked in a chaotic competition for control of these zones, which have taken on strategic importance in the history of humankind due to the effects of global warming. The photographs in Arctic: New Frontier by Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir van Lohuizen are an alarming testimony to the speed of transformation in the region and the upheavals that are taking place on a global scale.

The exhibition is accompanied by a bilingual French-English catalogue co-published by Reliefs and Fondation Carmignac, which will be available from November 7, 2018.

Cover of the book Arctic: New Frontier by Yuri Kozyrev & Kadir van Lohuizen co-published by Reliefs and the Fondation Carmignac.

Yuri Kozyrev (b. 1963) | based in Moscow (Russia) | has covered every major conflict in the former Soviet Union | lived in Baghdad (Iraq) between 2003 and 2009, as a contract photographer for TIME magazine | has received numerous honours, including several World Press Photo awards and the prestigious Visa d’Or News Award in 2011 for his work on the Arab Spring | named the 2011 Photographer of the Year in the Pictures of the Year International competition.

Kadir van Lohuizen (b. 1963) | based in Amsterdam (the Netherlands) | a founding-member of NOOR, a collective focusing on contemporary global issues | started to work as a professional freelance photojournalist in 1988 covering the Intifada | has covered social, human rights and environmental issues as well as conflicts in Africa and elsewhere | best known for his long-term projects on the seven rivers of the world (Rivers), the rising of sea levels (Where Will We Go), the diamond industry (Diamond Matters) and migration in the Americas (Vía PanAm), all ended as photo books | has received numerous prizes and awards in photojournalism | a frequent lecturer and photography teacher.

More info about the award @ www.fondationcarmignac.com

Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir van Lohuizen – ARCTIC: NEW FRONTIER
@ Cité des sciences et de l’industrie (30 avenue Corentin Cariou, Paris, France)
The exhibition will be open to the public between November 7 and December 9, 2018

James Arthur Allen wins the first Rebecca Vassie Memorial Award

James Arthur Allen

James Arthur Allen

The Rebecca Vassie Trust announces James Arthur Allen as the winner of the first Rebecca Vassie Memorial Award for emerging photographers for his project documenting the lives and traditions of the ethnic Circassian population in Israel.

The award is a bursary of GBP 1,200, plus printing, exhibition and mentoring, for an emerging photographer to complete a narrative photography project with a strong social or political context. It has been created in memory of the British photojournalist Rebecca Vassie, who died suddenly last year, aged 30, while on assignment in a refugee camp in Uganda.

Judges for the award included Karen McQuaid, senior curator at the Photographers’ Gallery, Matthew Tucker, UK Picture Editor at BuzzFeed, photographer Ben Bird and Janet Vassie, Rebecca’s mother. The judges were impressed by Allen’s detailed knowledge of the complex history of the Circassians, who were expelled from their country in the nineteenth century after the Russian-Circassian War, and the contacts he’d developed in the region.

Allen will be mentored by Bette Lynch, Director of Photography, News, Europe, Middle East and Africa at Getty Images, who was also part of the judging process. He also receives access to premier printing services at Metro Imaging, print partner to the award.

The capital city of Georgia, Tbilisi looking towards the great Mountains of the South Caucasus. Lying on the banks of the Kura River the city was founded in the 5th century. Tbilisi's proximity to vital trade routes between East and West has made it a prize fought over by rival empires through out history. Taken from the 'Land of Wolves - Nationalism, Culture, Identity in the South Caucasus Republic of Georgia' photo essay.

The capital city of Georgia, Tbilisi looking towards the great Mountains of the South Caucasus. Lying on the banks of the Kura River the city was founded in the 5th century. Tbilisi’s proximity to vital trade routes between East and West has made it a prize fought over by rival empires through out history.
Taken from the ‘Land of Wolves – Nationalism, Culture, Identity in the South Caucasus Republic of Georgia’ photo essay

Two further applications were highly commended: David Shaw for his proposal exploring racial divides in Oldham, and Tracey Paddison for her project following a non-binary person through gender reassignment.

“It is a huge privilege to be selected for the inaugural Rebecca Vassie Memorial Award,” – says James Arthur Allen. – “I’m thrilled to have been given the opportunity to make new work and collaborate with the Trust over the coming months. One of the first stateless people in modern history, the Circassians of Israel are unique in retaining their traditions and identity while being among the only Muslims serving in the Israel Defence Force. This proposal aims to explore and document an ancient nation and its place in the modern world.”

Roland Abdushelishvili, an activist and mineworker, stands outside the manganese plant in the northern town of Chiatura. Manganese is Georgia's second biggest export. Accidents are common in the mines and the town suffers heavy pollution and high cancer rates. Roland campaigns for better conditions while recognising vast investment is needed to bring the Soviet era mines in line with EU regulations. Taken from the 'Land of Wolves - Nationalism, Culture, Identity in the South Caucasus Republic of Georgia' photo essay.

Roland Abdushelishvili, an activist and mineworker, stands outside the manganese plant in the northern town of Chiatura. Manganese is Georgia’s second biggest export. Accidents are common in the mines and the town suffers heavy pollution and high cancer rates. Roland campaigns for better conditions while recognising vast investment is needed to bring the Soviet era mines in line with EU regulations.
Taken from the ‘Land of Wolves – Nationalism, Culture, Identity in the South Caucasus Republic of Georgia’ photo essay

Allen studied Press and Editorial Photography at University College Falmouth, graduating in 2012. His work was selected for the Best Emerging Graduate Talent feature in the British Journal of Photography, and has appeared in numerous publications including the Financial Times Magazine, Huck Magazine and The Guardian. He has completed commissions for the Rory Peck Trust, is a contributing photographer to Institute Artist Management and lectures on the BA Photography course at Bath Spa University. He has a long-term interest in the peoples of the Caucuses and has previously documented ethnic groups in Georgia and Abkhazia.

“We are delighted to grant our first award to James,” – say Janet and Kelly Vassie. – “Like Rebecca, he has found both a region and people he is passionate about photographing. James’s passion is infectious, and we feel he is at the right point to make the most of this opportunity.”

Young girls at an orthodox rally in central Tbilisi. The Georgian Orthodox Church has around 3.6 million members out of a total population of 4.6 million. The church holds vast power and influence in a secular republic after years of Soviet oppression. Taken from the 'Land of Wolves - Nationalism, Culture, Identity in the South Caucasus Republic of Georgia' photo essay.

Young girls at an orthodox rally in central Tbilisi. The Georgian Orthodox Church has around 3.6 million members out of a total population of 4.6 million. The church holds vast power and influence in a secular republic after years of Soviet oppression.
Taken from the ‘Land of Wolves – Nationalism, Culture, Identity in the South Caucasus Republic of Georgia’ photo essay

The Rebecca Vassie Trust is an unincorporated charitable foundation, set up in 2016 in memory of Rebecca Vassie, to create career development opportunities for emerging photographers and to promote the art of narrative photography.

Rebecca Vassie Memorial Award Open Call

Refugees from South Sudan, Uganda 2014

Refugees from South Sudan, Uganda 2014

The Rebecca Vassie Trust today announces the inaugural Rebecca Vassie Memorial Award. The award is a bursary of GBP 1,200 plus printing, exhibition in London in March 2017 and mentorship, for an emerging photographer in the UK to complete a narrative photography project.

Judges for the award include Karen McQuaid (curator at the Photographers’ Gallery), Matthew Tucker (UK Picture Editor at BuzzFeed) and Bette Lynch (Director of Photography, news, Europe, Middle East and Africa at Getty Images).

Entebbe. LGBT Pride, Uganda 2014

Entebbe. LGBT Pride, Uganda 2014

Premier printing services are being donated by Metro Imaging, who will also grant the winner a portfolio review with creative director Prof. Steve Macleod.

Applicants for the award, who must be either from or based in the UK, are asked to submit a proposal setting out a compelling vision for a photography project with a strong social or political context. The deadline for submissions is Friday, October 7, 2016 at 5.00 PM BST.

Rebecca Vassie

Rebecca Vassie

The award is created in memory of Rebecca Vassie, a British photographer and photojournalist who died suddenly last year (March 2015), aged 30, while on assignment in a refugee camp in Uganda. Rebecca trained in photography at the University for the Creative Arts. She had been based in Uganda for three years, working as a stringer for Associated Press, with her pictures appearing in major newspapers worldwide. She also photographed for a number of charities and NGOs as well as pursuing her own projects, such as documenting Uganda’s transgender community and its Olympic boxing hopefuls.

Rebecca’s parents Janet and Eric, sister Kelly and brother Tim said: “Beccy’s death turned our world upside down, but we have been overwhelmed by the outpouring of love and support from both our friends and hers. Many people said they wanted to do something in her memory. We hope this award is a way of providing photographers with exactly the kind of opportunity from which Beccy would have benefited, as well as honouring Beccy’s memory and the extraordinary work she did, of which we are very proud.”

The Rebecca Vassie Trust is an unincorporated charitable foundation, set up in 2016, to create career development opportunities for emerging photographers and to promote the art of narrative photography.

More info and submissions details @ www.rebeccavassietrust.org

Winners of the POPCAP’16

The international photography competition POPCAP announced the winners of its 5th anniversary edition. The award aims to foster interest in and support for contemporary African photography. This year’s winners were chosen by an international panel of 20 renowned judges from 900 applications from 94 countries. The winning artists and their projects will be presented at a series of international exhibitions. They are also invited to take part in an artists’ residency program.

The winners and their projects:

Nicolas Henry (b. 1978) | based in Les Mesnuls (France) – African Tales from Today (2012–2014)

African Tales from Today is a set of photographs taken with communities in Africa (Ethiopia, Rwanda, Madagascar and Namibia) and in the African communities living in the suburb of Paris (France). The project is close to a traveling theatre. The tales talk about Africa. The scenes are made with objects found on site. The scenography is set up with the local community in order to evoke the narrative seen in the image. Each story is decided and shared as a commitment of models. The photographic moment is similar to a theatre because many people come to attend this “performance” , the eye of the audience creates a new dialogue. The unified group expresses not only its vision to the world, but tries to share it with its own community too.

Exodus of the Neg Marron. Taken from the African Tales from Today series

Exodus of the Neg Marron.
Taken from the African Tales from Today series

Bus Oromo. Taken from the African Tales from Today series

Bus Oromo.
Taken from the African Tales from Today series

Living museum 1. Taken from the African Tales from Today series

Living museum 1.
Taken from the African Tales from Today series

Living museum 2. Taken from the African Tales from Today series

Living museum 2.
Taken from the African Tales from Today series

Indian and Cowboys Movie. Taken from the African Tales from Today series

Indian and Cowboys Movie.
Taken from the African Tales from Today series

Jason Larkin (b. 1979) | based in London (United Kingdom) – Waiting (2013–2015)

“While living in Johannesburg, I was struck by the ever-present reality of people waiting. Inactive yet expectant, this condition becomes a visual echo of the predicament that many South Africans can find themselves in. Though many wait alone, the amount of people waiting becomes a collective, city-wide experience,” – says Jason Larkin. – “Visually I was drawn to those seeking shelter from the harsh summer sun by positioning themselves in the shade. Figures here occupy ephemeral spaces of respite created by the surrounding urban environment. These shadows remove the individuals’ identities, leaving only the subtlety of posture and the details of place. With only the waiting period accompanying each image, the purpose or possible outcomes of these situations is unclear. We are left to meditate on the temporality of these individual situations and the indirect connections that waiting creates across society.”

7 hours 30 minutes. Taken from the Waiting series

7 hours 30 minutes.
Taken from the Waiting series

20 minutes. Taken from the Waiting series

20 minutes.
Taken from the Waiting series

35 minutes. Taken from the Waiting series

35 minutes.
Taken from the Waiting series

2 minutes. Taken from the Waiting series

2 minutes.
Taken from the Waiting series

30 minutes. Taken from the Waiting series

30 minutes.
Taken from the Waiting series

Sabelo Mlangeni (b. 1980) | based in Johannesburg (South Africa) – Isivumelwano: An Agreement (2003–2014)

“The first time I used a camera was for a wedding in 1997,” – says Sabelo Mlangeni (doc! #34). – “I did not get a chance to see the photographs because the bride picked them up straight from the lab. ‘Isivumelwano: An Agreement’ is an attempt to reconstruct these images looking at how an event about the love between two people becomes a community event.”

The project started in South African townships and continued with an exploration of wedding ceremonies in the capital cities of Lesotho, Mozambique and Swaziland. The resulting body of work focuses on the beauty and ornate nature of these ceremonies as well as the traditions and attire that embrace the adaptability of cultures in today’s African cities. Wedding ceremonies in black Southern African cultures are significant gatherings, often with more than one day of celebrations. The work looks at the way Southern African cultures have been adapted over the years looking particularly at the amalgamation of African cultural practices and Western white wedding rituals seen predominantly in metropolises.

Emfuleni, Fikile and her family. Taken from the Isivumelwano: An Agreement series

Emfuleni, Fikile and her family.
Taken from the Isivumelwano: An Agreement series

Thapelo and Malira Mamiala, Mohale/s Hoek. Taken from the  Isivumelwano: An Agreement series

Thapelo and Malira Mamiala, Mohale/s Hoek.
Taken from the Isivumelwano: An Agreement series

Impelesi, Vryheid. Taken from the Isivumelwano: An Agreement series

Impelesi, Vryheid.
Taken from the Isivumelwano: An Agreement series

Faith and Sakhi Moruping, Themsisa Township. Taken from the Isivumelwano: An Agreement series

Faith and Sakhi Moruping, Themsisa Township.
Taken from the Isivumelwano: An Agreement series

Sthembile Mavus. Taken from the Isivumelwano: An Agreement series

Sthembile Mavus.
Taken from the Isivumelwano: An Agreement series

Thom Pierce (b. 1978) | based in Cape Town (South Africa) – The Price of Gold (2015)

Over a period of 20 days in September and October 2015, Thom Pierce traveled around South Africa’s Eastern Cape, into Lesotho and up to Johannesburg to find and photograph 56 sick miners and widows named in a class action lawsuit against 32 gold mining companies in South Africa, lodged on behalf of all miners suffering from Silicosis or Pulmonary Tuberculosis (TB) as a result of working in the gold mines. The photographs were displayed in the building next door to the courtroom in Johannesburg at the time of the case in October 2015. This was done as a piece of advocacy, to put a human face to the often stark and detached courtroom proceedings.

Silicosis is a preventable but incurable lung disease that is contracted in the gold mines through inadequate protection from silica dust. Miners who contract silicosis get tired and out of breath quickly and are prone to lung infections, respiratory failure and TB. Most miners who became sick were sent home with little or no compensation and no hope of finding further employment.

Nanabezi Mgoduswa (with his wife Nokwanda) worked in the gold mines for 21 years. He has silicosis and drug resistant TB. He received no compensation. Taken from The Price of Gold series

Nanabezi Mgoduswa (with his wife Nokwanda) worked in the gold mines for 21 years. He has silicosis and drug resistant TB. He received no compensation.
Taken from The Price of Gold series

Xolisile Butu (with his mother Adelaide) worked in the mines for 7 years. He developed pulmonary TB and received R1000 compensation. Taken from The Price of Gold series

Xolisile Butu (with his mother Adelaide) worked in the mines for 7 years. He developed pulmonary TB and received ZAR 1000 compensation.
Taken from The Price of Gold series

Masiko Somi (with his wife Magumede) worked in the mines for 19 years. He has silicosis and received no compensation. Taken from The Price of Gold series

Masiko Somi (with his wife Magumede) worked in the mines for 19 years. He has silicosis and received no compensation.
Taken from The Price of Gold series

Nosipho Eunice Dala - the widow of Zwelakhe Dala who worked in the gold mines for 28 years and developed silicosis. He received no compensation. Taken from The Price of Gold series

Nosipho Eunice Dala – the widow of Zwelakhe Dala who worked in the gold mines for 28 years and developed silicosis. He received no compensation.
Taken from The Price of Gold series

Patrick Sitwayi (with Asive Bingwa) worked in the gold mines for 22 years. He has silicosis and received no compensation. Taken from The Price of Gold series

Patrick Sitwayi (with Asive Bingwa) worked in the gold mines for 22 years. He has silicosis and received no compensation.
Taken from The Price of Gold series

Julia Runge (b. 1990) | based in Berlin (Germany) – Basterland (2015)

100 years after the Rehoboth Basters rose up against their German colonisers, the Basterland series takes up the task of providing a multifaceted insight into the contemporary life of the ethnic group living in Namibia today. It is a portrait of a society that seems to find itself in an “in-between“ amid tradition and change. The series reminds us a forgotten episode of German colonial history. The name Baster (Afrikaans for German bastards) may seem a little pejorative. But the Baster community gave it themselves because it reminds them of their heritage and emergence. The Basters are the offspring of the union between European settlers and their indigenous Khoisan slaves during the colonial period in the 18th century. During the South African colonisation, the Basters became a more and more unwanted and stigmatised group. Since Namibia’s independence in 1990, the Basters are the only traditional grouping in Namibia with no special legal status and to this day they fight for their acceptance and recognition in society.

Chomma. Taken from the Basterland series

Chomma.
Taken from the Basterland series

Three generations of Basterwomen. Taken from the Basterland series

Three generations of Basterwomen.
Taken from the Basterland series

Sussie. Taken from the Basterland series

Sussie.
Taken from the Basterland series

Elista. Taken from the Basterland series

Elista.
Taken from the Basterland series

Wreath-laying ceremony. Taken from the Basterland series

Wreath-laying ceremony.
Taken from the Basterland series

Visit POPCAP website @ www.popcap.cc for more information.

The POPCAP’16 was organised under doc! photo magazine patronage.

The 2016 FotoEvidence Book Award goes to Daniella Zalcman

© Daniella Zalcman_2

FotoEvidence, a platform for documentary photographers whose work focuses on social justice and human rights, announced that photojournalist Daniella Zalcman will receive the 2016 FotoEvidence Book Award and that a book of her project – Signs of Your Identity – will be published by FotoEvidence this year.

Signs of Your Identity documents stories of indigenous Canadians who were placed in boarding schools run by the Church in order to force their assimilation into the dominant culture. The Indian Residential School system was created by the Canadian government in the 1840s.

“Attendance was mandatory, and Indian Agents would regularly visit reserves to take children as young as 2 or 3 from their communities. Many of them wouldn’t see their families again for the next decade” – says Daniella Zalcman. – “Students were punished for speaking their native languages or observing any indigenous traditions, routinely physically and sexually assaulted, and in some extreme instances subjected to medical experimentation and sterilisation. The last residential school didn’t close until 1996. The Canadian government issued its first formal apology in 2008. The lasting impact on Canada’s indigenous population is immeasurable and grotesque. At least 6,000 children died while in the system and those who did survive, deprived of their families and their own cultural identities, became part of a series of lost generations. Languages died out, sacred ceremonies were criminalised and suppressed. The Canadian government has officially termed the residential school system a cultural genocide.”

© Daniella Zalcman_1

Zalcman uses double exposure portraits to portray her subjects. These multiple exposure portraits juxtaposes survivors who are still fighting to overcome the memories of their residential school experiences, with the sites where those schools once stood, government documents that enforced strategic assimilation and places where, even today, First Nations people struggle to access services that should be available to all Canadians.

© Daniella Zalcman_3

Daniella Zalcman is an award-winning photojournalist based in London (UK) and New York City (NY, USA). Her work has been published in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Time, Sports Illustrated and CNN, among others. She is a multiple grantee of the Pulitzer Centre on Crisis Reporting. Her photographs have been exhibited throughout the US and Europe and are part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. She graduated from Columbia University in 2009 with a degree in Architecture.

The jury also selected four finalists who will be exhibited with Daniella Zalcman at the 2016 FotoEvidence Book Award Exhibit in New York in November of 2016 when Signs of Your Identity will be released as book. The finalists include:

© Narciso Contreras

Narciso Contreras for Yemen: the Forgotten War where an intervention by Saudi Arabia against a Houthi insurgency has internally displaced nearly 1.4 million people, killed more than 6,000, shutdown hospitals and left 21 million people in need of dire humanitarian assistance. With virtually no media coverage, Yemen’s war is not only a forgotten war, but for many it is also an unknown war.

© Mario Cruz

Mario Cruz for Talibes, Modern Day Slaves documents the conditions faced by young boys in Senegal sent or sold to “teachers” who promise education but instead turn their charges into beggars collecting money on the streets. The boys are often kept in harsh conditions, chained, beaten and forced to beg. Their education mainly focused on memorising passages from the Koran.

© Hossein Fatemi

Hossein Fatemi for An Iranian Journey which documents Iran’s complex society, lifting the veil on some of the less observed areas of daily life, showing the conflicts that arise between the official version of Iranian life promoted by the authorities and the reality of daily life for Iran’s youth, struggling to find an identity in a fast moving, ever changing world. Daily, millions of young people engage in activities that are officially illegal and can carry severe penalties. While the government likes to think of Iranian society as a monolithic unit occupying the moral high ground in stark contrast with a degenerate, immoral West, the reality of daily life in the Islamic Republic is one which bears all the hallmarks of a modern hybrid with all the usual problems and vices.

© Ingetje Tadros

Ingetje Tadros for This is My Country that looks at conditions for indigenous Australians, whose communities are mismanaged by their governments, are not fully understood by the wider aid community and are largely invisible to most of Australian society. A voiceless and unseen minority consigned to lives of quiet desolation.