Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir van Lohuizen @ La Cité

The Arctic Gate terminal is located in the Gulf of Ob, near Cape Kamenny (Russia). The first oil barrel was shipped out from the terminal in 2014, and winter out-shipments started in 2015. It was launched as part of the Novy Port oil field development.
Yamal Peninsula (Russia), April 2018
© Yuri Kozyrev | NOOR for the Fondation Carmignac

Dedicated to the Arctic, chaired by Jean Jouzel, and under the patronage of the French Ambassador for the Arctic and Antarctic Poles, Minister Ségolène Royal, the 9th edition of the Carmignac Photojournalism Award went to Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir van Lohuizen (NOOR). Their awarded project Arctic: New Frontier will be exhibited in the Paris based Cité des sciences et de l’industrie.

The Carmignac Photojournalism Award funds annually the production of an investigative photo-reportage on human rights violations, geostrategic and environmental issues in the world. Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir van Lohuizen’s project is a pioneering double expedition which explores the effects of climate change on the entire Arctic territory. They want to experience the dramatic transformation of natural landscapes and the demographics in the Arctic, and the impact of these changes on the lives of the region’s inhabitants.

“The photos of Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir van Lohuizen are superb,” – says Jean Jouzel, climatologist, winner of the 2012 Vetlesen Award and co-winner of the 2007 Nobel Peace Award as Director of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change IPCC. – “Through them, from Siberia, Svalbard and Greenland to Canada and Alaska, we discover the Arctic of today, with its landscapes and wildlife that are drawing a growing number of tourists, as well as its populations who are exposed to extreme climates and who mine resources such as nickel and, increasingly, gas, oil and coal. Protecting the environment does not appear central to their activity, to put it mildly.”

For the very first time, two photojournalists have simultaneously covered the irreversible changes that have taken place in the Arctic, to bear witness to the effects of the melting of the ice-caps.

Yuri Kozyrev (doc! #7 & #37) travelled the route of the Russian maritime ports of the Arctic, accompanying the last remaining Nomadic people of the region, the Nenets, during their seasonal movement known as transhumance. This was interrupted for the first time in the Nenets’ history in 2018, because of the melting of the permafrost. Kozyrev skirted the coast of the Barents Sea in the north of the country, and travelled aboard the Monchegorsk, the first container ship to use the Northern Sea route unassisted. He encountered people who had been made ill by nickel mining in Norilsk, and then travelled to Murmansk, where the first floating nuclear power plant is under secret construction.

A whale hunter is on the outlook to track Bowhead whales. The Point Hope native community can catch 10 bowheads a year.
Point Hope (AK, USA), May 2018
© Kadir van Lohuizen | NOOR for the Fondation Carmignac

Kadir van Lohuizen (doc! #7 & #36) started his journey on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard archipelago. He then followed the Northwest Passage, which is now the shortest route between Europe and Asia thanks to the melting ice. In Greenland, he met scientists who have recently discovered the existence of frozen rivers beneath the ice-cap, which are directly contributing to the planet’s rising water levels. South of Cornwallis Island, off the coast of Canada, he lived in the small community of Resolute, which has recently been home to a training facility for the Canadian Army, as climate change has led to ever-increasing routes through the Arctic region. Finally, he travelled to Kivalina, an indigenous village on the northern tip of Alaska, which, according to current forecasts, will disappear underwater by 2025.

The forces of tourism, militarisation, exploitation of gas and mineral resources, and the opening of trade routes mean that the Arctic is today the site of clashes between countries and multinationals who are locked in a chaotic competition for control of these zones, which have taken on strategic importance in the history of humankind due to the effects of global warming. The photographs in Arctic: New Frontier by Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir van Lohuizen are an alarming testimony to the speed of transformation in the region and the upheavals that are taking place on a global scale.

The exhibition is accompanied by a bilingual French-English catalogue co-published by Reliefs and Fondation Carmignac, which will be available from November 7, 2018.

Cover of the book Arctic: New Frontier by Yuri Kozyrev & Kadir van Lohuizen co-published by Reliefs and the Fondation Carmignac.

Yuri Kozyrev (b. 1963) | based in Moscow (Russia) | has covered every major conflict in the former Soviet Union | lived in Baghdad (Iraq) between 2003 and 2009, as a contract photographer for TIME magazine | has received numerous honours, including several World Press Photo awards and the prestigious Visa d’Or News Award in 2011 for his work on the Arab Spring | named the 2011 Photographer of the Year in the Pictures of the Year International competition.

Kadir van Lohuizen (b. 1963) | based in Amsterdam (the Netherlands) | a founding-member of NOOR, a collective focusing on contemporary global issues | started to work as a professional freelance photojournalist in 1988 covering the Intifada | has covered social, human rights and environmental issues as well as conflicts in Africa and elsewhere | best known for his long-term projects on the seven rivers of the world (Rivers), the rising of sea levels (Where Will We Go), the diamond industry (Diamond Matters) and migration in the Americas (Vía PanAm), all ended as photo books | has received numerous prizes and awards in photojournalism | a frequent lecturer and photography teacher.

More info about the award @ www.fondationcarmignac.com

Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir van Lohuizen – ARCTIC: NEW FRONTIER
@ Cité des sciences et de l’industrie (30 avenue Corentin Cariou, Paris, France)
The exhibition will be open to the public between November 7 and December 9, 2018

Toujours Paris @ Peter Fetterman Gallery

Henri Cartier-Bresson (France, 1908-2004). On the Banks of the Marne, Paris, 1938 Gelatin silver print, 12x16 inches. Signed in ink on recto. (Inv #HCB14-16) © Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson | Magnum Photos, Courtesy of Peter Fetterman Gallery

Henri Cartier-Bresson (France, 1908-2004). On the Banks of the Marne, Paris, 1938
Gelatin silver print, 12×16 inches. Signed in ink on recto. (Inv #HCB14-16)
© Henri Cartier-Bresson Foundation | Magnum Photos, Courtesy of Peter Fetterman Gallery 

Using the French Humanist movement of the 1930s as its inspiration, Santa Monica based Peter Fetterman Gallery invites to its Toujours Paris exhibition featuring a curated collection of artists including Henri Cartier-Bresson, Louis Stettner, and Martine Franck, among others.

French humanist photographers produced a new vision of the world that lived between realism and poetry, creating a movement focused on the everyday human experience by capturing personal anecdotes and spontaneous moments of daily life. French humanist photography greatly impacted the cinema and literature of the immediate post-war period and its artistic current travelled through till the late 1960s. Even today, French humanism retains its strength and dignity in contemporary art at a time when humanism is needed more than ever. Between photojournalism and picturesque paintings of society, humanist photography is a superb witness of personalities and customs, revealing the beauty behind the banal.

Louis Stettner (USA, 1922 - 2016). Crossing the Seine: Mother and Child, Paris, 1950. Gelatin silver print; 20x16 inches. Signed, titled and dated in pencil on verso. Embossed stamp on recto. (Inv #23661) © Estate of Louis Stettner, Courtesy of Peter Fetterman Gallery

Louis Stettner (USA, 1922 – 2016). Crossing the Seine: Mother and Child, Paris, 1950.
Gelatin silver print; 20×16 inches. Signed, titled and dated in pencil on verso. Embossed stamp on recto. (Inv #23661)
© Estate of Louis Stettner, Courtesy of Peter Fetterman Gallery

Sabine Weiss (Switzerland, b. 1924). La sortie de metro, Paris, 1955 (printed later) Gelatin silver print; paper 20x16 inches image 17.5x 12.25 inches. Signed, titled, & dated in pencil on print verso. (Inv #SWS16-38) © Sabine Weiss, Courtesy of Peter Fetterman Gallery

Sabine Weiss (Switzerland, b. 1924). La sortie de metro, Paris, 1955 (printed later)
Gelatin silver print; paper 20×16 inches image 17.5x 12.25 inches. Signed, titled, & dated in pencil on print verso. (Inv #SWS16-38)
© Sabine Weiss, Courtesy of Peter Fetterman Gallery

The photographs of French humanist pioneers, such as Robert Doisneau, Édouard Boubat, Brassaï, and Willy Ronis, fed the newspapers and magazines of the era and are still celebrated and emulated today. These artworks, charged with emotion, have the undeniable documentary value of authenticity and simultaneously celebrate a nostalgic aesthetic that often romanticises the French way of life. Over the years, this duality has particularly attracted serious collectors of the style.

Today the works of these artists continue to awe audiences with endearing views into the everyday life of post-war France. These works have been exhibited internationally in nearly every major institution and continue to garner praise and provide inspiration to a modern generation of artists and collectors alike.

Willy Ronis (France, 1910-2009). La Nuit au Chalet, 1935. Gelatin silver print; 16x20 inches. Signed in ink on recto; titled & dated in pencil with the photographer's stamp on verso. (Inv #5480). © Estate of Willy Ronis, Courtesy of Peter Fetterman Gallery

Willy Ronis (France, 1910-2009). La Nuit au Chalet, 1935.
Gelatin silver print; 16×20 inches. Signed in ink on recto; titled & dated in pencil with the photographer’s stamp on verso. (Inv #5480).
© Estate of Willy Ronis, Courtesy of Peter Fetterman Gallery

Robert Doisneau (France, 1912-1994). Le Manege De Mr. Barre, 1953 (printed later) Gelatin silver print; mat 24x20 inches; paper 19.75x16 inches, image 15x13.5 inches. Signed in ink on recto; titled and dated in ink on verso. (Inv #RD13-11) © Estate of Robert Doisneau, Courtesy of Peter Fetterman Gallery

Robert Doisneau (France, 1912-1994). Le Manege De Mr. Barre, 1953 (printed later)
Gelatin silver print; mat 24×20 inches; paper 19.75×16 inches, image 15×13.5 inches. Signed in ink on recto; titled and dated in ink on verso. (Inv #RD13-11)
© Estate of Robert Doisneau, Courtesy of Peter Fetterman Gallery

Boubat/Brassaï/Cartier-Bresson/Doisneau/Franck/Ronis/Stettner/Weiss – TOUJOURS PARIS
@ Peter Fetterman Gallery (2525 Michigan Ave. #A1, Santa Monica, CA, USA)
Opening reception: October 27 between 2.00 and 5.00 PM
The exhibition will be open to the public until February 23, 2019

Mac Adams @ MOCAK

 

Taken from The Mysteries series (1976–1977). Digital photograph. © Mac Adams Courtesy of gb agency, Paris (France)

Taken from The Mysteries series (1976–1977). Digital photograph.
© Mac Adams
Courtesy of gb agency, Paris (France)

MOCAK Museum of Contemporary Art in Krakow invites you to the first individual presentation of Mac Adams’ works in Poland. The subject of the artist’s fascination and source of inspiration are situations which are both ambiguous and disturbing. He creates installations and photographs in which he manipulates the perception of viewers in such a way that they have the impression of watching a crime scene. The make-believe installations are convincing representations of places where a murder had apparently just taken place. The pictures, in turn, suggest a crime through three different sets of shots. The first group consists of photographs presenting objects which could be treated as material evidence by the police. The second is the moments captured by the camera that appear to precede the supposed crime, sometimes combined into diptychs with photographs that can be considered documentation of the crime scene. The third group comprises shots of the crime viewed through its reflections on shiny objects.

Taken from The Mysteries series (1976–1977). Digital photograph. © Mac Adams Courtesy of gb agency, Paris (France)

Taken from The Mysteries series (1976–1977). Digital photograph.
© Mac Adams
Courtesy of gb agency, Paris (France)

Taken from The Mysteries series (1976–1977). Digital photograph. © Mac Adams Courtesy of gb agency, Paris (France)

Taken from The Mysteries series (1976–1977). Digital photograph.
© Mac Adams
Courtesy of gb agency, Paris (France)

 

The artist applies the style of police documentation, which strives for maximum objectivity and detachment, removing any emotional involvement. Rather than convey a specific chain of events, he merely hints at how they may have unfolded through snatches of individual vignettes. In doing so, Adams reveals the perversity of our imagination and inclination to seek traces of a crime committed in the circumstances observed. Crime is repugnant, yet for the majority, curiosity gets the better of revulsion. It would appear that we find evil more intriguing than normality. 

 

Taken from the Postmodern Tragedies series (1987). Digital photograph. © Mac Adams Courtesy of gb agency, Paris (France)

Taken from the Postmodern Tragedies series (1987). Digital photograph.
© Mac Adams
Courtesy of gb agency, Paris (France)

Mac Adams (b. 1943) | based in Montclair (New Jersey, USA) | graduated from Cardiff College of Art (UK) and Rutgers University (USA) | for 30 years was a Distinguished Teaching Professor at the State University of New York in Old Westbury (USA) | has presented his works at individual and group exhibitions internationally | his works can be found in public collections of MoMA (New York, USA), Musée National d’Art Moderne and Maison Européenne de la Photographie (both Paris, France), The Museum of Fine Arts (Houston, USA) and Fotomuseum (Winterthur, Switzerland), among others.

Mac Adams – CRIME?
@ MOCAK Museum of Contemporary Art in Krakow’s Beta Gallery (4 Lipowa St., Cracow, Poland)
Opening reception: October 25 at 6.00 PM
The exhibition will be open to the public between October 26, 2018 and March 17, 2019

The Mac Adams exhibition is organised under doc! photo magazine patronage.

Results of the 25th Edition of the Bayeux Calvados-Normandy Award

Palestinian Saber al-Ashkar (29) hurls rocks during clashes with Israeli forces along the border with the Gaza strip as Palestinians demonstrate for the right to return to their historic homeland in what is now Israel. Gaza City (Palestine), May 11, 2018 © AFP Photo | Mahmud Hams

Palestinian Saber al-Ashkar (29) hurls rocks during clashes with Israeli forces along the border with the Gaza strip as Palestinians demonstrate for the right to return to their historic homeland in what is now Israel.
Gaza City (Palestine), May 11, 2018
© AFP Photo | Mahmud Hams

Fifty war correspondents have gathered in Bayeux (France) on October 12 and 13 to debate and award trophies in the following categories: photo, print, radio, television, grand format television, young reporter – photo and video image. 

Three honorary awards have been attributed: the Regional Prize for Students and Trainees of Normandy (television), the Public’s Choice Award (photo) and the Ouest-France Jean Marin Prize (print).

The winners ot the 25th Bayeux Calvados-Normandy Award for war correspondents are:

Photo Trophies (awarded by Nikon)

  • 1st prize: Mahmud Hams (AFP) – Clashes on Gaza’s Border (Palestine)
  • 2nd prize: Laurent van der Stockt (Le Monde) – The Old Town of Mosul: The Battle Against the Last Bastion of Daesh (Iraq)
  • 3rd prize: Juan Barreto (AFP) – Venezuela: Anti-Government Protests (Venezuela)

Print Trophies (awarded by the Department of Calvados)

  • 1st prize: Kenneth R. Rosen (Activist Magazine) – The Devil’s Henchmen (Iraq)
  • 2nd prize: Wolfgang Bauer (ZEITmagazin International) – The Poison of War (Sudan)
  • 3rd prize: Rukmini Callimachi (The New York Times) – The Daesh Method, or the Administration by Terror (Iraq)

Radio Trophies (awarded by the D-Day Landing Committee)

  • 1st prize: Gwendoline Debono (Europe 1) – Neither Prisoners Nor Refugees: Jihadist Wives in Syria (Syria)
  • 2nd prize: Julie Pietri (France Inter) – Rohingyas: The Hell of the Crossing (Bangladesh)
  • 3rd prize: Martin Patience (BBC) – Surviving a Syrian Snowstorm (Lebanon)

Television Trophies (awarded by Amnesty International)

  • 1st prize: : Nima Elbagir, Alex Platt and Raja Razek (CNN) – Libya Slave Auction (Libya)
  • 2nd prize: Clive Myrie and Darren Conway (BBC) – Mexico’s Drug War (Mexico)
  • 3rd prize: Jonathan Head and Daniel Bull (BBC) – Rohingya (Bangladesh)

Grand Format Television Trophy (awarded by SCAM)

  • Nicolas Bertrand and Thomas Donzel (France 2) – Rohingyas: The Damned of Burma (Myanmar and Bangladesh)

Young Reporter Trophy – Photo (sponsored by Capa Presse TV)

  • Mushfiqul Alam (freelancer) – The Great Exodus (Bangladesh)
Taken from The Great Exodus project © Mushfiqul Alam

Taken from The Great Exodus project
© Mushfiqul Alam

Video Image Trophy – Television and Grand Format Television (sponsored by BEW TV, ARTE, France 24)

  • Darren Conway (BBC) – Mexico’s Drug War (Mexico)

Regional Prize for Students and Trainees of Normandy – Television

  • Stéphanie Perez, Nicolas Auer and Laetitia Niro (France 2) – Lion Cubs of the Caliphate: Time Bombs? (Iraq)

Ouest-France Jean Marin Prize – Print

  • Jean-Philippe Remy (Le Monde) – Yemen at War (Yemen)

Public’s Choice Award – Photo (sponsored by the French Development Agency AFD)

  • Paula Bronstein (Getty Images Reportage) – The Rohingya Crisis: A Harrowing Journey (Bangladesh)
A Rohingya girl cries, traumatised after days of walking, with little sleep, as thousands of people fleeing from Myanmar are stranded in the scorching hot sun on a muddy rice field waiting to be allowed into the camps by Bangladeshi Border guards in Anjuman Para. Anjuman Par (Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh), October 16, 2017  © Paula Bronstein | Getty Images Reportage

A Rohingya girl cries, traumatised after days of walking, with little sleep, as thousands of people fleeing from Myanmar are stranded in the scorching hot sun on a muddy rice field waiting to be allowed into the camps by Bangladeshi Border guards in Anjuman Para.
Anjuman Par (Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh), October 16, 2017
© Paula Bronstein | Getty Images Reportage

“I am proud to be in Bayeux and to chair the international jury of the 25th Bayeux Calvados-Normandy Award for war correspondents,” – said Christiane Amanpour, chairman of the jury. – “The entries were extremely powerful and of a very high quality. It was a pleasure to watch them with my colleagues, discuss them, debate and vote.”

The winners of the first places received prizes ranging from EUR 3,000 to EUR 7,000.

A Feast of Analogue Photography Fans in Bydgoszcz

Taken from the Brought to Light project © Masha Ivashintsova Courtesy of the Vintage Photo Festival, Bydgoszcz

Taken from the Brought to Light project
© Masha Ivashintsova
Courtesy of the Vintage Photo Festival, Bydgoszcz

Bydgoszcz is a special spot on the photographic map of Poland. It was here, where the only Polish factory producing light sensitive materials on a paper base (1926-2007) was located. No wonder that Bydgoszcz is the venue for the festival focused on analogue photography – Vintage Photo Festival.

The motto of this year’s, the fourth edition of this festival is A Woman Behind and in Front of the Lense. The programme includes unusual exhibitions, among which a special attention attracts the first ever presentation of photographs by Masha Ivashintsova, called the Russian Vivian Maier, discovered somewhere in the attic of a house in Saint-Petersburg.

Until recently, Masha Ivashintsova (1942-2000) was a completely unknown photographer. When 30 thousand negatives and 500 prints along with memoirs were found, the world learnt about a talented artist from Russia, who moved in the underground Leningrad (former USSR) society of poets and photographers and who actively participated in the life of bohemian life of the 1960s to 1980s.

All Masha’s photographs, consisting of the Brought to Light exhibition, will be presented such as her daughter Asya found them – with all the traces left on them by time: dust, scratches and bends. The photographs, placed in light-boxes, indicate the non-narrative character of the exhibition.

“We are taking the challenge to show Masha’s negatives in a raw state, like non-polished diamonds,” – says Katarzyna Gębarowska, the director of the festival. – “The artist’s pictures are like streets of Saint-Petersburg, which she photographed. No matter they are clear or not, they reflect the beautiful, cool light of the North.”

Taken from the Villa Argentina project © Arunà Canevascini Courtesy of the Vintage Photo Festival, Bydgoszcz

Taken from the Villa Argentina project
© Arunà Canevascini
Courtesy of the Vintage Photo Festival, Bydgoszcz

Taken from the Village Queens project Eric Schuett Courtesy of the Vintage Photo Festival, Bydgoszcz

Taken from the Village Queens project
Eric Schuett
Courtesy of the Vintage Photo Festival, Bydgoszcz

Taken from the Childhood Revisited project © Shuwei Liu Courtesy of the Vintage Photo Festival, Bydgoszcz

Taken from the Childhood Revisited project
© Shuwei Liu
Courtesy of the Vintage Photo Festival, Bydgoszcz

Winner of the 2018 Vintage Grand Prix contest © Paulina Ząbek Courtesy of the Vintage Photo Festival, Bydgoszcz

Winner of the 2018 Vintage Grand Prix contest
© Paulina Ząbek
Courtesy of the Vintage Photo Festival, Bydgoszcz

There will also appear Arunà Canevascini, the winner of this year’s Photo London Book Dummy Award with her project Villa Argentina. There will be also an opportunity to see projects of the finalists of the last two editions of LensCulture Portrait Award – Eric Schuett’s Village Queens and Shuwei Liu’s Childhood Revisited as well as the laureates of the international 2018 Vintage Grand Prix contest. Certainly, an additional attraction of the festival will be the presentation of photographs from the Joanna and Krzysztof Madelski’s collection, chosen exclusively for this exhibition, and the presentation of the 20 laureates of this year’s edition of the DEBUTS project. 

Taken from the Nowhere project © Raj Lalwani Courtesy of the BLOW UP PRESS, Warsaw

Taken from the Nowhere project
© Raj Lalwani
Courtesy of the BLOW UP PRESS, Warsaw

Traditionally, during the festiwal numerous meetings and workshops will take place. The programme of the festival consists of discussion panel devoted to collecting photographs and screenings of films on old techniques. A special attention deserves the film by Eva Ionesco My Little Princess, based on her memories. The film, set in Paris of the 1970s, tells about life of a 10 years old girl, whose mother, a photographer belonging to the Parisian bohemia, turns her into a model, her muse. Bold photographs of the small girl sparked outrage in the artistic world. 

More info @ vintagephotofestival.com

4th Vintage Photo Festival
Bydgoszcz (Poland)
October 12-27, 2018

The 2018 Vintage Photo Festival is organised under doc! photo magazine patronage.